How To Make Your Own Survival Ration Bars

How to Make Your Own Survival Ration Bars
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You'll Love This Recipe for Delicious Survival Ration Bars!

Often when we think of survival ration bars we think of a dry bland energy bar that does a good job in providing quick and easy food rations but is often lacking in taste. So we thought, “why not make your own survival ration bar?” If you make your own you can actually know what’s in them and you can make them have a taste to your liking. We got together with a few friends and here’s what we found.

Apparently there are a couple of different recipes out there for these survival bars, we just used one I had been given by a food storage lady. This was really an interesting experiment, because there were 6 of us making these survival bread loaves, and of course they turned out 6 different ways. We’ll discuss what happened as we go through the directions.

Apparently there are a couple of different recipes out there for these survival bars, we just used one I had been given by a food storage lady. This was really an interesting experiment, because there were 6 of us making these survival bread loaves, and of course they turned out 6 different ways. We’ll discuss what happened as we go through the directions.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups oats
  • 2 1/2 cups powdered milk
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 TB honey
  • 1 3 oz package jello (orange or lemon)
  • 3 TB water

Mix the oats, powdered milk, and sugar together in a bowl.

In a medium pan mix water, jello and honey. Bring to a rolling boil. This is just the 3 TB water called for in the recipe, not the cup of water you’d usually use when making jello. A rolling boil is when the mixture doesn’t stop boiling when you stir it.

Add jello mixture to dry ingredients. Mix well. Mixing by hand, you’ll probably end up just working the ingredients together with your hands rather than trying to mix with a spoon. OR use a quality mixer and it’s done in a jiffy! My Kitchenaid had no problem mixing this dough.

If the dough is too dry, add a small amount of water a teaspoon at a time. In my tests I added about 5 extra TEASPOONS of water total to the dough and I live in super dry desert area, so you may not need that much. Your dough should be crumbly, but stick together when pressed.

Press the dough into a 9″ x 13″ parchment lined pan.

After I had pressed the dough in by hand, I used a tortilla roller (mine is just a piece of 1″ dowel) to even it out and press it in more firmly.

Originally we made brick shaped loaves, but a brick shape is not very conducive to eating, and this stuff baked up so hard it could not be sliced, just broken into pieces. I also tried pressing the dough into a sheet cake pan, but the bars turned out too thin and crumbled after baking. Pressing into a 9″ x 13″ pan was magic.

Cut the dough into bars. Use a knife or a pizza cutter, but you’ll want to cut all the way through. Parts that were just scored and not cut through crumbled when I broke them apart.

Now you can bake it or dehydrate it.

To bake the bars, place the pan in a 200 degree oven and bake for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. When the bars are done baking, remove them from the pan by lifting the parchment paper and allow to cool. Separate the pieces.

To dehydrate the bars, carefully pull the bars out of the pan using the parchment paper, separate, and place on dehydrator trays. Dehydrate at 145 degrees for 4-6 hours until thoroughly dry.

The heat does help these stick together better, so baking gives a nicer result than dehydrating.

Pack them up. When they are thoroughly dry and completely cool, pack them into a zip seal bag, FoodSaver bag, Mylar bag, or wrap in foil.

These bars have a very long shelf life. Based on the original ingredients, I’d give them at least 20 years properly dried and packaged. The short story on the bars we made almost five years ago is that they are still with us.

Approximately 2000 calories per batch, easy to make, and now easier to eat, these bars are perfect for your emergency kits!

Via: Food Stoarge and Survival

 

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